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City of Muscatine Communication Blog

Hello and welcome to our blog. As the Communication Manager for the City of Muscatine, Iowa, I know the importance of communicating with residents and providing them with an understanding of the different functions of the City, why these functions are important to our residents, and what the City is doing for the future of our community.

Many times the story of the various activities, accomplishments, and happenings within the City are not told and we want to make sure that the people behind these activities, accomplishments, and happenings are duly recognized. We also want to explain our vision of the future for the City of Muscatine, something that we take great pride in.

Please check back in periodically to see updates on what's going on here in Muscatine! Please feel free to leave comments on individual postings--the comments will not be displayed here, but they will be emailed to me so that I can collect your thoughts and make adjustments based on the feedback and suggestions. Moderated comments are an option as we progress. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this to be an effective tool!

Feb 28

L.O.S.T. - It is not a tax increase but could prevent one

Posted on February 28, 2018 at 11:56 AM by Kevin Jenison

Some individuals have the idea that if the Local Option Sales Tax (L.O.S.T.) question is approved it will increase their taxes. Nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, LOST could benefit local taxpayers by holding off increases in fees and tax rates, at least in regards to paying for the mandated sewer replacement project and the City’s pavement management program.

L.O.S.T. is a special-purpose tax implemented and levied at the city or county level and always attached onto a state’s base sales tax rate, most commonly at a rate of one percent (1%). The tax is not just a tax on the buying habits of local residents but rather a tax on the buying habits of anyone who purchases a product or service within Muscatine County. The local option tax collected within a county is placed in a special distribution fund which is dispersed on the basis of population and property tax levies.

The special-purpose tax can only be implemented upon approval by voters in the city or county and the referendum must state exactly what the money will be used for. Once stated, and approved, the money cannot be used for any other purpose unless another special election is held to change the distribution of the revenue received.

The City of Muscatine is asking voters to approve extending the local option sales tax for a 15-year period starting July 1, 2019 and ending June 30, 2034. Specifically, the ballot question states that not less than 80 percent of the proceeds will be used for sanitary and storm sewer projects with the rest used to fund the Pavement Management Program.

L.O.S.T. has been a part of the local economy since July 1, 1994, after Muscatine voters approved the first ballot question in May of 1994. All proceeds collected during the five-year period were entirely used to fund sanitary and storm sewer projects.

The same ballot question was approved for another five-year period in August 1998. However, in January 2003 voters were asked to redefine the distribution of L.O.S.T. funds with up to 10 percent of the revenue assisting in the financing of the Pearl of the Mississippi Projects.

Eight projects were included in the $10.67 million Pearl of the Mississippi Project including the Weed Park Aquatic Center, American Heritage Trail Extension, Musser Park Skatepark, community art, marina improvements, boat launch relocation, Riverview Center renovation, and the Environmental Learning Center at Discovery Park.

From FY 2002/2003 through FY 2008/2009, L.O.S.T. contributed $1.5 million to the overall project fund.

To continue funding the sanitary and storm sewer projects, and the Pearl of the Mississippi Projects, voters approved another five-year extension in January 2004. With the contribution to the Pearl of the Mississippi Projects ending in the first half of 2009, the City of Muscatine opted to continue splitting the L.O.S.T. proceeds when the question came up again in August 2008.

The aging city infrastructure had been a matter of debate for many years and the City of Muscatine saw an opportunity to fund repairs to the city streets, sidewalks, and alleys through L.O.S.T. When voters were asked in August 2008 to extend L.O.S.T. for a 10-year period, they were also asked to approve not less than 80 percent of the revenue going towards sanitary and storm sewer projects and no more than 20 percent for pavement management projects. Eighty-one percent of the voters who went to the polls supported the measure.

Approximately $533,000 of each year’s L.O.S.T. revenue has been transferred to the Pavement Management Program with $4.25 million of street improvement projects completed during the first eight years of the program. These funds were also used to supplement Road Use Tax funds that are used to support the annual Asphalt Overlay and full-depth concrete patching. L.O.S.T. revenue also supplemented funds for the Colorado and Cedar streets reconstruction projects as well as the Diana Queen Drive Extension project. The reconstruction of Cleveland Street from Park Avenue to 2nd Avenue is the latest example of the use of local option sales tax revenue to improve the infrastructure of the city.

Of course the main reason for L.O.S.T. is funding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated sewer separation which requires the City to complete specific major projects by 2028. The West Hill Sewer Separation Project is the final project included in the EPA Consent Order. The City reached the half way point of the six phases late in 2017 which marked 34 percent completion of the sewer separation.

Phase IV of the project begins this spring and continues for the next three years and completes another 17 percent of the overall project with Phase V scheduled for 2020 through 2022 completing another 13 percent. The largest and most expensive of the phases begins in 2022 with Phase VI which will complete the final 36 percent of the sewer separation project.

A total of $54.4 million has been raised in the 23 year history of the local option sales tax with $49.7 million spent on the various sewer separation projects since 1994. It is estimated that $40.1 million will be needed to fund the remaining three phases.

L.O.S.T. is a significant factor in the City being able to keep sewer fees and the city tax rate from being affected by the mandated EPA Consent Order. The extension of the local option sales tax means that Muscatine will be able to complete the sewer separation project within the parameters set by the federal government without the use of additional taxpayer dollars.

Visit the City of Muscatine Local Option Sales Tax information page HERE.
Feb 16

Rescue training pays benefits

Posted on February 16, 2018 at 9:49 AM by Kevin Jenison

When the tones break the stillness inside Muscatine Fire Department station, all normal activity ceases. They listen, recognizing what each one means, and then spring into action as the dispatcher begins his or her announcement.


Even though they may know the type of incident and the location, there is still the unanswerable question of what the responders will find upon arrival. And that is where training comes in.

Continue Reading...

Jan 23

Budget Season Is Upon Us

Posted on January 23, 2018 at 3:16 PM by Kevin Jenison

Like a farmer preparing his (or her) fields for the growing season, City of Muscatine staff have been busy preparing their fields of proposals for the Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Budget Season. Last November department heads began meeting with their respective staff to work on and complete reports of accomplishments, expectations for the future, and budget proposals for the upcoming fiscal year. While working to complete this extremely important task, city staff have been dutifully dedicated to their regular work routine and to the citizens of Muscatine.


It is Budget Season for the City of Muscatine and although the season only lasts a short period of time on the calendar, its impact will be felt a year from now and in the year's to come.


The City of Muscatine is required to adopt an annual budget by March 15 of each year. The process begins in November when the departments are presented with their budget materials and instructions on the process. The initial department proposals are reviewed by Nancy Luecks, city financial director, and Gregg Mandsager, city administrator, and then refined in meetings with the individual departments during December.


There are a myriad of issues and challenges associated with preparing a departmental budget just as there is in combining those budget proposals into one comprehensive city budget that meets the needs of the citizens of Muscatine. It is no small feat especially when you consider future money is never guaranteed, just anticipated.


While local government cannot control what happens with the state legislature in Des Moines, local government can look ahead towards what they can do to ensure the expectations of its citizens are met. Long range plans that are geared toward increasing the population of residents, homes, and businesses have their base in these budgets. City departments, then, have to forecast what they can do to reach the long term goals while meeting the needs of citizens today … and stay within the confines of the anticipated dollars they will receive in the coming fiscal year.


That part of the Budget Season has passed. And now …


Now, as January comes to a close, it is time for these department budget proposals to be presented to the Muscatine City Council, the governing body of the City of Muscatine who are the final decision makers as to what shape the budget for the next fiscal year will look like. The process begins Thursday (Jan. 25) at 5:30 p.m. when the City Council convenes to hear the General Fund Overview. Over the next two weeks, each department and agency will have their time before the City Council to plead their case, to answer questions, and, if needed, to modify their budgets.


All budget sessions are open to the public and a schedule of the meetings in available at this link … Budget Schedule. Each session has different departments presenting with citizens welcomed at all of the presentations. Public comment at this time is not part of the process but DO take notes because time for citizen input has been set aside during the Public Hearing that is tentatively scheduled for Thursday, March 1 (the actual date and time will be set by City Council at the conclusion of the department/agency presentations).


Throughout the budget process there are numerous opportunities to participate and engage with your City staff and Council members. Please stay tuned for periodic updates on the process, issues and challenges the City faces in putting together a budget for a full service city, and a budget that meets our community needs but is also responsible at the same time.


The City of Muscatine values constructive input and appreciates hearing your ideas. You can comment here on our blog, visit the Community Voice section of our web site, visit our social media sites at Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, or you can email us to stay connected.

Kevin Jenison, Communication Manager